Estate Planning & Administration in HK
estate administration

Estate Planning & Administration in HK: A Comprehensive Guide

Estate planning is a proactive approach to managing and distributing your assets according to your preferences, both during your lifetime and after your passing. Notarizing estate planning documents is crucial, as it authenticates and validates documents, prevents fraud, minimizes family disputes, and expedites probate.
Probate ordinance in Hong Kong
intestacy

All About Probate Ordinance in Hong Kong

Navigating the probate ordinance in Hong Kong is essential for anyone managing estate assets. To deal with estate property, one must obtain a Grant of Probate or a Grant of Letters of Administration, ensuring compliance with legal requirements. This guide provides detailed steps and requirements for securing these grants, ensuring a smooth process for asset management and inheritance.
Probate meaning
intestacy

Probate Meaning and What We Need to Know About It

A person will usually leave a will for their family long before they die. But if there is a special event such as someone dies without a will, then in Hong Kong the estate will be divided and managed in accordance with existing laws. Before we learn about how it is distributed when someone dies and whether there is a valid will or not, we need to know about the meaning of probate, the Probate Registry, and several cases regarding probate. Hope this article will help you regarding probate when learning more about wills in Hong Kong. What is probate meaning? Probate is a court order that authorizes one or more people to manage the deceased's inheritance in accordance with the instructions in the Will. This person is called the executor. The inheritance in question can be money in bank accounts, company shares, house, real estate, cars, and other assets left under the deceased's name. Probate is a general term for legally processing the rights in an estate. Probate is needed to handle the assets of someone who has died, especially for relatives who are not left with a will. Why was the Probate Registry established? Any inheritance issues will be regulated by the Probate Registry, and the Probate and Administration Ordinance (Cap.10) delegates the authority to issue Grants to the High Court. The Registrar of the High Court is required to exercise these powers and process all applications that do not give rise to disputes. The Probate Registry has been established as an integral part of the Judiciary to assist it in carrying out its duties. What does the Probate Registry do? The Probate Registry assists the Registrar in processing applications and submitting requisitions to ensure that Grants will be awarded to the correct person according to the law. This also assists him in carrying out other functions according to law including carrying out the functions of Official Administrator. Everyone who wants to take care of a will left by one of their family members must understand the probate meaning and get probate, because for simple and straightforward cases it takes a long time, around 5 to 7 weeks on average. If the nature of the estate is complicated, the time required will be longer. Issues that need to be considered with or without a will When a person dies, there may be an estate left under the deceased's name. A Grant of Representation from the Probate Registry of the High Court must be in place to administer the deceased's assets, whether the deceased has made a will or not. A Grant of Representation acts as proof that someone has the right to deal with the deceased's estate. There is always the question of which jurisdiction (the laws of which country) should regulate the administration and succession of the inheritance if there are foreign elements involved. For example, the deceased person was not a resident of Hong Kong, but left property in Hong Kong, or the deceased Hong Kong person may have owned property abroad. In general, the following rules might provide a reference answer: Succession to "immovable assets" (buildings, flats, land) is regulated by the law of the place where the assets are located. For example, if a Hong Kong resident owns a flat in the UK, the flat will usually be governed by UK succession laws after your death. The succession of “movable property” (personal effects, money, company shares) is regulated by the law of the place of domicile of the deceased person on the date of death. For example, the movable property of a deceased person who was a resident of the UK is usually governed by English succession law, wherever the property is located. The differences between estate with a will and without a will A Grant of Representation is the collective term for a Grant of Letters of Administration or a Grant of Probate. Probate meaning will be influential here, because a Grant of Probate is a Grant given to the executor (male) or executrix (female) named in the last Will of the deceased person. If there is no executor/executrix written in the Will, or there is no Will, someone who wants to administer the deceased's estate must obtain a Grant of Letters of Administration. This Grant is given to administrators who include the next-of-kin (the deceased's spouse, children, parent, uncle, siblings, etc.). Probate - Six Simple Steps in Handling and Distributing the Estate of a Deceased Person A Personal Representative is an executor/executrix or an administrator. The Personal Representative has the authority to deal with the estate, such as arranging the distribution of assets to the beneficiaries. With a will It needs to be clear for all the assets inherited from someone who has died, that the assets that will be managed or distributed must settle all debts, administration expenses, and other beneficiaries first. If the deceased person has written down who the executor/executrix is, then that is the only person who is entitled to apply for a Grant of Probate. What if the executor/executrix does not want to take up the appointment or there is no executor appointed by the deceased survivors? The person entitled to the residual legacy in the Will can apply for a Grant of Letters of Administration. Once all conditions are met, the person is entitled to the remainder of the deceased's estate. Without a will If no Will is found or the Will has been revoked, the law of intestacy will determine who is the rightful person who can apply for a Grant of Letters of Administration. There is an order of priority regulated in rule 21 of the Non-Contentious Probate Rules (Cap. 10A of the Laws of Hong Kong): surviving husband/wife or surviving partner or union of concubinage (second and subsequent wives taken during the lifetime of the first wife) entered into before 7 October 1971 Direct descendants of the deceased or any children born of a union of concubinage during the life of the first wife entered into before 7 October 1971, or descendants of the child who died during the deceased person's lifetime The parent(s) of the deceased Siblings of the deceased or descendants of the deceased's brothers or sisters who died during the deceased's lifetime. The High Court also has the authority to appoint someone who is not included in the hierarchy to manage the inheritance. This power is useful if the closest relative of the deceased, who should have the right to be appointed as administrator, is under 21 years of age or does not have sufficient mental or physical capacity to manage the estate.   Is Probate meaning confusing for you? Or do you already understand a lot about Probate and Will? Don't worry because SMEBrother will help with everything you need, starting from making a Will, managing a Will, or whatever difficulties you have regarding a Will. SMEBro provides professional cross-border estate notarization services to ensure that the estate can be properly managed and distributed. 💪💪 Services include: ✅ Estate Survey and Assessment: A comprehensive survey and assessment of the estate will be conducted to ensure that all assets and liabilities are clear. ✅ Legal process guidance: A professional legal team will assist you in completing various legal procedures required for cross-border inheritance distribution to ensure that everything is legal and compliant. ✅Careful follow-up throughout the entire process: We have professional teams from Hong Kong and Mainland China who are familiar with inheritance matters and can help you break cross-border barriers and successfully inherit your inheritance.
intestate estate ordinance in Hong Kong
cost of making a will in hong kong

Things You Need to Know About Intestate Estate Ordinance in Hong Kong

Each country has different intestacy laws to deal with the distribution of assets of people who passed away without a valid will. Two important keys in this regard are the Intestate Estate Ordinance (Cap. 73) and the Wills Ordinance (Cap. 30). Learning about these laws can help you in the crucial event that your loved one dies intestate. The goal of these laws is to ensure a fair distribution of the deceased's estate among relatives. This article will discuss how assets will be divided, and what relatives can do to manage them. Intestate Estate Ordinance in Hong Kong According to the Intestates' Estates Ordinance (Cap. 73) when a person dies while not executing a will in Hong Kong, then the estate of that person will be distributed and that person is called an intestate in this case. There are many possibilities for someone not taking care of a will while they are alive, due to sudden illness, being away from relatives, new marriages, or various other personal reasons. If there are relatives who suddenly want to take care of the inheritance of someone who has died, and after checking it turns out that person has never made a will, then they must obtain a Grant of Letters of Administration from the Probate Registry. Those who are entitled to apply for the Grant of Letters of Administration for inherited assets are the people regulated in rule 21 of the Regulations. There are highest priorities starting from a surviving spouse, children, parents, siblings, grandparents, uncles and aunts. Those who are able to obtain a Grant of Letters of Administrations are able to deal with the estate in accordance with the Intestates Estates Ordinance. After arranging for the funeral of the deceased and obtaining the Grant of Letters of Administration, the administrator must settle any debts, expenses, and collate all the assets of the deceased. Now, the estate will be distributed to the beneficiaries in accordance with section 4 of the IEO, and will be explained below. Entitlement on Intestacy If there is only the spouse, no children/grandchildren of the deceased, parents, full siblings or children/grandchildren of full siblings, then the entitlement arrangement is handed over to the surviving spouse. If there is a spouse and children/grandchildren of the deceased and other immaterial relatives, the surviving spouse gets personal chattels and half of the residual estate and HK$500,000. The other half for statutory trust (refer to the Intestate Estate Ordinance) for the surviving children/grandchildren. For the spouse and one or more of the relatives such as parent or full sibling or children/grandchildren of full sibling, the surviving spouse gets personal chattels, half of the residual estate, and HK$1,000,000. The other half for the surviving parents or on statutory trusts for the full siblings. For no spouse and only children/grandchildren of the deceased, the entitlement arrangement is all for the surviving children/grandchildren on statutory trust. For no spouse, no children, only parents, all rights go to parents. If there are only full siblings, no spouses, children, or parents, all rights go to full siblings on statutory trusts. The law will continue according to who the recipient is, and who the remaining family is. For half siblings, grandparents, full uncles and aunts, half uncles and aunts, it will be handed over according to the administrator on statutory trusts. Especially for someone who has no relatives at all, everything will be taken care of by the Hong Kong Government as unowned property. Distribution of Estates (resume) The distribution of an intestate's estate will be sorted according to priority, starting from spouse and children, then parents, full siblings, half siblings, grandparents, full uncles and aunts, half uncles and aunts, and so on. If the remaining people in the family are a spouse and children, the spouse gets household items or personal chattels, HK$1,000,000 in cash, and part of the remaining property. The children will share the other half. If the deceased person only has a spouse without children, the spouse gets personal chattels, HK$1,500,000 in cash, and half of the remaining estate. The remainder of the estate will be divided between the deceased's surviving parents or surviving siblings. That order will continue to be repeated according to priority, unless there are special conditions where the person who died has no relatives at all, and the price will be managed by the Hong Kong Government as unowned property. Do you know the procedure of inheritance in Hong Kong? In case of inheritance, a legal personal representative must be appointed to manage the inheritance. This representative, known as an administrator, is usually the highest ranking relative according to inheritance rules. Administrators must apply for a Grant of Letters of Administration from the High Court Probate Registry before they can deal with the deceased's assets as we discussed above. Conclusion The intestate estate ordinance in Hong Kong provides a systematic approach to dividing the estate of a deceased person in the absence of a valid will. However, these laws may not reflect the deceased's personal wishes when creating their own will. Immediately make a will for your beloved family, because we can provide comfort for the family in the future, and also ensure that there is no will in your name that has been registered and could be considered fraud. Therefore, it is always advisable to seek professional legal advice and consider making a will and how assets will be divided according to one's wishes. Making a will is complex and there is a lot to take care of. Even though we already know the intestate estate ordinance, we still don't know exactly what we need to prepare to make a valid will. Knowing this, you need SMEBrother as your one stop solution for everything regarding wills. SMEBro provides services including: ✅ Estate Survey and Assessment: A comprehensive survey and assessment of the estate will be conducted to ensure that all assets and liabilities are clear. ✅ Legal process guidance: A professional legal team will assist you in completing various legal procedures required for inheritance distribution to ensure that everything is legal and compliant. ✅Careful follow-up throughout the entire process: We have professional teams from Hong Kong and Mainland China who are familiar with inheritance matters and can help you break cross-border barriers and successfully inherit your inheritance.
Probate - Six Simple Steps in Handling and Distributing the Estate of a Deceased Person
death intestate

Probate - Six Simple Steps in Handling and Distributing the Estate of a Deceased Person

When a person dies, he/she may leave behind some assets, such as bank deposits, cars, stocks and shares, properties and so on. Anyone who wishes to deal with the estate of a deceased person must first go to the Probate Office of the High Court of Hong Kong to obtain a Grant of Probate in accordance with the legal procedures. A Grant of Probate is a court document issued by the Probate Office which authorizes the Executor or Administrator of the estate to receive all the assets of the estate, to discharge the debts of the deceased and to distribute the estate to the beneficiaries of the estate. The power of an Executor is derived from the deceased's Will, so his/her powers and duties begin at the moment of the testator's death. The Administrator's powers are derived from the Letters of Administration, so his/her powers and duties should start from the date of the Letters of Administration, not from the moment of the deceased's death.The procedure for handling an estate is as follows.Step 1: Collect the deceased's belongings and liabilities to prepare an InventoryFirst, the Executor or Administrator will go through all the personal belongings and liabilities of the deceased, e.g. belongings kept in the home or safe deposit box, bank deposits, credit card debts, etc., and prepare an inventory of the deceased's belongings, which will be included in the Estate's Inventory of Assets and Liabilities to be filed with the Probate Office.Step 2: Search for the deceased's WillIt is important to ascertain whether the deceased had made a Will as this will have a direct bearing on the application process for the grant of Letters of Administration and who can inherit the estate. Possible ways to do this include checking all the deceased's personal documents, making enquiries with the deceased's relatives, friends, financial and legal advisors, and checking the deceased's bank safe deposit box. In addition, if a solicitor has been engaged to apply for a grant of representation, the solicitor can be asked to conduct a will search through the Law Society of Hong Kong to see if the deceased had made a will in Hong Kong through another solicitor.Step 3: Determine who will file the Petition in CourtIf the deceased had made a Will, it is the Executor of the Will who should file a Petition for Probate and apply for a Grant of Probate. However, if the deceased did not make a will, according to Rule 21 of the Undisputed Probate Rules (Chapter 10A of the Laws of Hong Kong), the order of priority of applicants is as follows: (a) spouse, (b) children of the deceased, (c) father or mother of the deceased, and (d) brothers or sisters of the deceased. Generally speaking, it is the person with the higher priority who should file the petition and apply for a grant of probate. However, if the person with the higher priority has died or wishes to waive his or her right to obtain a grant of probate, the person with the lower priority has the right to file a petition and apply for a grant of probate, provided that it can be proved that the person with the higher priority has died or waived his or her right to obtain a grant of probate. Letters of Entitlement may not be granted to more than four persons, and must be granted to no fewer than two persons if the estate involves minor beneficiaries or persons with life interests.Step 4: Negotiate the need to hire an attorney to handle the settlement.This will depend on the size of the estate and its complexity, for example.✅ If the estate consists entirely of money and does not exceed $50,000, the applicant may submit an application form and an affidavit to the Home Affairs Department. The affidavit must state that the total value of the deceased's estate does not exceed $50,000 and that it is entirely in cash, and must be accompanied by an inventory in duplicate setting out the particulars of the estate. HAD can then issue a Notice of Recognition of Estate in lieu of applying to the Probate Office for a Grant of Probate. In this case, the applicant or any other third party dealing with the estate will be given immunity from the provisions of the law on unauthorized handling of the estate.The Director of Home Affairs also has the power to(a) to issue a Certificate of Requirement to authorize the making of payments from the bank account of the deceased, e.g. to pay for the funeral expenses of the deceased and the living expenses of the dependants of the deceased;(b) Issue of "Certificate of Need to Inspect Bank Safe Deposit Box";(c) Issue of "Authorization for Removal from Bank Deposit Box".✅ If the estate (cash, bank deposits and MPF only) does not exceed $150,000, it can be dealt with by the Official Administrator in a summary manner without the need to engage a solicitor. If the funeral and burial expenses of the deceased have been paid by you in advance, you may apply to the Official Administrator for a refund of the funeral and burial expenses paid by you.✅ If the amount of the estate exceeds $150,000 but the composition of the estate is simple and uncomplicated, you may consider applying to the Public Applications Unit of the Probate Office to take over the estate of the deceased. If the Registrar considers it appropriate, assistance will be provided. ✅ In other cases, consideration may be given to engaging a solicitor. There is no standardized fee for an attorney to handle an estate, so you can negotiate with an attorney you know well.Step 5: Formal Application for Probate in CourtThe applicant has to submit documents to the Probate Office in support of his/her application to prove his/her entitlement to a Grant of Probate, e.g. death certificate of the deceased, original and copy of the deceased's Will (if applicable), documents showing the relationship between the deceased and the applicant, e.g. marriage certificate, birth certificates of the children, etc. The applicant has to sign an Execution of the Will, which will be signed by the applicant and the applicant will be entitled to a grant of probate. The applicant is required to sign an affidavit of the executor or administrator. The applicant is also required to prepare and sign an affidavit verifying a list of assets and liabilities and a list of the deceased's assets and liabilities in Hong Kong at the date of death. The applicant is required to answer questions raised by the Official of the Probate Office to the satisfaction of the Official.If, after the applicant has submitted all documents to the Probate Office (and the Grant of Probate has not yet been issued), it is found that the deceased had other assets. In this case, the applicant may submit a further Affidavit verifying the list of additional assets and liabilities. However, if the Probate has been duly issued, the applicant may bring along the Affidavit and the Affidavit of Verification of Additional List of Assets and Liabilities to the Probate Office to apply for amendments.Step 6: Distribution of EstateAfter obtaining a Grant of Probate, the Executor or Administrator will need to pay the deceased's debts (e.g. credit card debts), taxes (e.g. salaries tax, profits tax), funeral expenses, and other expenses (e.g. attorney's fees and court costs for the settlement of the Grant of Probate) out of the deceased's estate. The deceased's estate can then be distributed to the beneficiaries of the estate. If there is a will, the estate will be distributed according to the wishes of the testator. If there is no will, the estate will be distributed to the beneficiaries in accordance with the law of intestate succession. Details of the order of priority are set out in the Intestates' Estates Ordinance, Cap. 73, section 4 of the Laws of Hong Kong.
Mainland & Hong Kong Inheritance of Family Estates - Which Laws Prevail?
death intestate

Mainland & Hong Kong Inheritance of Family Estates - Which Laws Prevail?

I am a Hong Kong resident, should I apply the laws of the Mainland or Hong Kong to inherit my family's estate in the Mainland?What is the difference and what are the potential risks? What do I need to know about cross-border inheritance? Cross-border Inheritance in the Mainland and Hong KongMore and more people residing or purchasing properties in the Mainland often encounter cross-border inheritance issues, and there are two common scenarios.>After a Mainland resident passes away, he/she has left funds or stocks in a bank in Hong Kong, or he/she has real estate in Hong Kong, and these assets in Hong Kong need to be processed in Hong Kong for inheritance;>If a Hong Kong resident passes away and leaves real estate or capital in a bank in the Mainland, his assets in the Mainland need to be inherited in the Mainland.Application of Law: Who has the right of successionThe laws of Hong Kong and the Mainland are the same in determining the right of succession, i.e. the law of the place where the immovable property is situated applies to immovable property (e.g. real property), while the law of the place where the decedent's domicile is situated applies to movable property. In other words, if a Mainlander has left an estate in Hong Kong, the law of Hong Kong applies to the domicile of the heir to determine who has the right of succession to the estate in Hong Kong.For cash and stocks in Hong Kong bank accounts, the law of the place of residence of the heir, i.e. the Mainland, will determine who has the right of succession.If a Hong Kong resident has left an estate in the Mainland, the law of the Mainland will determine who has the right of succession in respect of the real estate in the Mainland, whereas the law of the place of residence of the decedent, i.e. the law of Hong Kong, will determine who has the right of succession in respect of the cash in bank accounts in the Mainland.   -Immovable property belongs to the place; movable property belongs to the person.Q: What is the determination of "domicile" in the Civil Law?A: Article 15 of the General Principles of Civil Law stipulates that: A citizen's domicile shall be the place of residence of his domicile, and if the place of habitual residence does not coincide with the domicile, the place of habitual residence shall be deemed to be the domicile.According to the laws of Mainland China, the order of succession in Hong Kong and Mainland China is that the estate of the decedent shall be divided equally among the surviving first-order successors (spouse, parents and children), and if none of the first-order successors is alive, the surviving second-order successors (siblings, grandparents and grandparents) shall succeed to the decedent's estate.Legal Order of Succession in the MainlandAccording to Hong Kong law, if the decedent has a spouse or children, the parents have no right of succession; if there is both a spouse and children, the spouse receives a fixed amount (HK$500,000) and half of the remainder, and the other half of the remainder goes to the children in joint succession and is divided equally.The biggest difference between Hong Kong and Mainland China is that the first order of successors under Mainland China's inheritance law includes parents, whereas Hong Kong's inheritance law is generally more favorable to spouses and not so favorable to parents. Inheritance Jurisdiction. Hong Kong Estates of Mainland ResidentsFor estates left in Hong Kong by Mainland residents, application should be made to the High Court of Hong Kong for probate (in the case of testamentary succession) or for an administration order (in the case of legal succession or where there is a will but the will does not appoint an executor).If the estate is immovable property such as real estate, the administrator will be determined in accordance with the laws of Hong Kong. If the estate is movable property such as bank deposits or stocks, the High Court of Hong Kong will determine the successor in accordance with the provisions of the laws of the Mainland and grant the right of administration of the estate to the person who has the right of inheritance. Such notarized documents need to be authenticated by the foreign affairs department authorized by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the PRC. After obtaining the High Court's authorization of probate, the administrator may, by virtue of the Court's order, contact various institutions such as banks to handle the procedures for distribution of the estate to the successors.Mainland Estates of Hong Kong ResidentsFor immovable properties such as houses, Mainland laws are applicable. The decedent can go directly to the notary public department in the Mainland to apply for a notarization of inheritance, and needs to submit relevant data (proof of identity of the decedent, proof of relationship with the decedent, etc., which need to be notarized by a judicial notary public in Hong Kong and Taiwan) to prove that the decedent has the right of inheritance, and the notary public department of the Mainland will issue a certificate of inheritance upon receipt of the relevant data and confirmation of the decedent's right of inheritance. With the Certificate of Succession Rights, the legatee shall apply to the relevant authorities for the transfer of real estate (statutory succession and testamentary succession are exempted from Deed Tax, but bequests are not exempted from Deed Tax). In respect of estates of movable properties such as bank deposits left in the Mainland by residents of Hong Kong camping in the Mainland, Hong Kong law shall apply to determine the successor. You should apply to a Hong Kong notary public appointed by the Ministry of Justice for a notarization of declaration of succession rights (renunciation of succession rights), and then apply to a notary public in the Mainland for a notarization of succession rights, and then apply to a bank or other institution for the transfer of the estate to the heir with the notarization of succession rights. As the notary publics in the Mainland are not familiar with the procedures of applying Hong Kong laws, this process may be more complicated.It is important to discuss the actual situation, the practical procedures and the relevant tax issues (Hong Kong status).It is important to seek professional assistance.
Without a will, how will the inheritance be inherited? (Case analysis)
death intestate

Without a will, how will the inheritance be inherited? (Case analysis)

The estate of a person who dies intestate with an estate in Hong Kong shall be distributed in accordance with the provisions of the Intestates' Estates Ordinance, Chapter 73, Laws of Hong Kong, as follows (1) If there is only a spouse and no children, parents or full blooded siblings or heirs of full blooded siblings, the estate shall be inherited by the spouse.(2) If survived by a spouse and heirs, the spouse shall receive first an interest in the estate of HK$500,000 and the remainder shall be divided into two shares, one to be received by the spouse and the other to be equally divided among the children.(3) If the deceased leaves no children but leaves a spouse and any of the following: a parent, a full-blooded sibling or a child of a full-blooded sibling, the spouse shall receive first an interest in the estate of HK$1,000,000 and the remainder shall be divided into two shares, one for the spouse and one for the parent, if the parent survives him or her, or if there is no parent, the whole of the estate, or the whole of the children, and the remaining part shall be divided into two shares, one for the spouse and one for the children. If there is no surviving parent, the remaining portion shall be divided into two shares, one for the spouse and the other for his or her father or mother, both of whom shall receive the same share if they are survived by their parents, and if there is no surviving parent, then the share shall be divided equally amongst all the brothers and sisters.(4) If the deceased is survived by children and does not leave a spouse, the children shall share his estate equally.(5) If the deceased does not leave a spouse, children or parents, the following persons shall be beneficiaries, in that order of priority(i) brothers and sisters of full blood; (ii) brothers and sisters of half blood; (iii) brothers and sisters of half blood.(ii) siblings of half-blood; (iii) grandparents and grandchildren; and(iii) grandparents; and(iv) siblings of full blood (i.e. half-brothers and half-sisters) of their parents, i.e. uncles, aunts, uncles, aunts and aunts; (v) half-brothers and half-brothers of their parents, i.e. aunts, uncles, aunts and aunts; and(v) siblings of half blood (i.e. half-brothers or half-brothers) of their parents, i.e. uncles, aunts, uncles and aunts.Such a distribution of estate may cause great problems and bring a lot of inconvenience to the heirs. Example 1A family of four, the father died, leaving the mother with a son and a daughter. The estate consists of a residential unit valued at HK$12,000,000 and HK$500,000 in cash, which the father held separately and lived with the mother. After the death of the father, according to the "Intestates' Estates Ordinance", the mother can get HK$500,000 first, and the remaining residential unit with a market value of HK$12,000,000 has to be divided into two, with the mother getting HK$6,000,000, and the son and the daughter getting the remaining HK$6,000,000, i.e. HK$3,000,000 each. 000, i.e. HK$3,000,000 each. The problem arises that if the son or daughter asks to sell the flat to get his/her share of the money, the mother cannot refuse and the mother may lose her home. Example 2Many young couples in Hong Kong nowadays do not want to have children. If the husband dies and they have no children, but they have surviving parents or siblings, the total value of the husband's estate is HK$11,000,000, and the wife receives HK$1,000,000, and the rest of the HK$10,000,000 has to be divided into two parts, each of which is HK$5,000,000, and the wife receives one part, and the other part has to be given to her. The wife gets one share and the other is to be given to the deceased husband's parents, or if the parents are deceased, to the husband's siblings in equal shares, which may not be the couple's wish. Of course, if the family is characterized by filial piety and brotherly love, the situation mentioned in the above examples will not occur. Family members may be willing to transfer their benefits from the estate to a certain family member, such as the children in Example 1 may transfer their interests to their mother, the in-laws in Example 2 may transfer all the benefits from their son's estate to their daughter-in-law, or the siblings may transfer all the benefits from their brother's estate to their sister-in-law. The parties concerned need to sign a Deed of Family Arrangements. However, the signing of this Deed requires the payment of additional solicitor's fees, and if the interests to be transferred include properties, stamp duty may have to be paid, and all these troubles can in fact be avoided by the signing of a will by the deceased before his death. Some people may think that there is no problem if the deceased's spouse is allowed to hold all the deceased's estate without signing a deed of family arrangement or asserting his/her rights on the basis of mutual trust, as the family members are harmonious anyway. However, things change. If a beneficiary has financial problems and goes bankrupt, the Official Receiver may recover his/her interest in the deceased's estate on behalf of his/her creditors; or if a beneficiary is divorced, his/her divorced spouse may recover his/her interest in the deceased's estate in the Family Court as part of the distribution of the divorced couple's property. So, a will is better than no will at all!
Do you know the procedure of inheritance in Hong Kong?
death intestate

Do you know the procedure of inheritance in Hong Kong?

Overview of Inheritance Procedures in Hong KongThe procedure for inheritance in Hong Kong varies depending on whether the deceased died with a valid Will and an Executor appointed. Generally speaking, the main procedures of inheritance in Hong Kong are: firstly, the person entitled to administer the estate of the deceased should apply to the Probate Office of the High Court of Hong Kong for the appointment of an administrator (or executor) by the court, and then the administrator (or executor) will distribute the estate to other beneficiaries entitled to inherit (successors) or administer the estate in other ways according to the lawDetermine who has the right to bring an action in court to be an administrator (executor).Before filing an application in court, it is important to determine who has the right to apply to be an administrator (executor) of a deceased person's estate. Generally speaking, if the deceased left a valid Will and the Will has named an Executor, the Executor named in the Will is the person who has the right to apply to the Court to administer the estate as an Executor. On the other hand, if the deceased did not leave a Will, or if he did leave a Will but did not validly appoint an Executor in the Will, the order of precedence should be determined according to the law as to who has the priority to apply for the right to be the Administrator. The order of priority for applying to be an administrator of a deceased person's estate under the laws of Hong Kong.Procedures for applying to be an AdministratorWhere the deceased did not leave a Will or where the Will does not validly appoint an Executor, a person who is entitled to priority under the law may apply to the Court for the appointment of an Administrator of the deceased's estate. The application should be made to the Probate Division of the High Court of Hong Kong.The documents that are normally required to be filed to make an application to be granted Letters of Administration include. an affidavit of application to become an Administrator, which varies according to the status of the applicant (e.g. being the spouse or a child or a parent of the deceased); If the deceased was domiciled outside Hong Kong, this needs to be supported by a separate ex parte application affidavit stating that the applicant is the person who has the power to administer the estate of the deceased under the law of the place of domicile of the deceased. Evidentiary documents in support of the above application include the death certificate of the deceased, the applicant's identity document, documents proving the kinship between the deceased and the applicant (e.g. birth certificates, marriage certificates, etc.), and documents proving that the person who had the right of priority before him/her has died or waived his/her right of priority. If the deceased was domiciled in a place other than Hong Kong, a legal affidavit from a solicitor of the place of domicile of the deceased certifying that the applicant is the person entitled to administer the estate of the deceased under the law of that place is also required.Upon receipt of the application documents, the Court will normally give its first reply within 1-2 months - the Court's reply is usually in the form of an interrogatory - the Court's interrogatory is a letter from the Court asking the applicant to make corrections to the application, to submit supplementary documents, or to amend the relevant documents. The applicant is required to make corrections, additions and supplementary submissions in response to the Court's questions until the Court is satisfied and a grant of Letters of Administration will be issued.If the applicant is a person outside Hong Kong, the Court will require the applicant to provide a guarantee that he/she will not administer the estate to the detriment of other persons (e.g. other heirs) after his/her appointment as Administrator.Legal Procedures for Applying to be an ExecutorIf the deceased has left a Will in which an Executor has been validly appointed, the Executor named in the Will should apply to the court for probate of the Will in order to be appointed by the court as an Executor.A petition for probate filed with the court requires the following documents. an original copy of the will. an affidavit of filing for probate, thereby making yourself an executor of the will.. If the will was not witnessed by a solicitor practicing in Hong Kong, it is usually necessary to submit an affidavit from the witness of the will stating the circumstances under which the will was made. identification document of the applicant.If the validity of the will is to be determined by foreign law, e.g. if the testator is not domiciled in Hong Kong and the will was not made in Hong Kong, the Court may require the applicant to submit a legal affidavit from a foreign lawyer certifying that the will is legally valid under the applicable foreign law.Procedures for administering the estate of a deceased personAfter obtaining a grant of letters of administration from the Court, the administrator (or executor) of the deceased's estate can use the grant of letters of administration to collect the estate from banks, securities companies, etc., to effect transfers, and to distribute the estate to other beneficiaries who are entitled to succeed to the deceased's estate - a process which normally does not require the involvement of the Court - and if any of the inheritors believes that his/her right of succession has been infringed by the administrator of the deceased's estate, he/she may bring an action in the Court. If any heir believes that his or her inheritance rights have been infringed by the administrator, he or she can bring a court action.